Category Physics

Sound Tubes (continued)
Physics

Sound Tubes (continued)

Closed tubes Considering a sound pipe of length â„“ whose waves propagate at a velocity v. Thus the possible configurations of standing waves are: The ways of vibration can, from these examples, be generalized as: And the frequency of harmonics will be given by: In a closed tube, only natural frequencies of the odd harmonics are obtained.

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Physics

Why does water put out fire?

In order to understand why water extinguishes fire, it is necessary to know the necessary conditions for the existence of fire, which are basically heat, oxidizer (oxygen) and fuel. When we remove one of these three components from the fire, it goes out! However, eliminating fuel (material being burned) is very difficult, and removing oxygen from the air as well.
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Physics

What are mirages?

A lake surrounded by palm trees in the middle of the desert. This is what is called an oasis. Or rather, it would be an oasis if it wasn't just a mirage. This is how it always happens in cartoons: the tired and thirsty traveler rushes toward that tropical oasis, and only when he is about to dive does the lake, along with all the palm trees, disappear.
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Physics

Relativity Applications

Restricted relativity, which deals with motions at speeds comparable to the speed of light in a vacuum when there is no acceleration at all, is a rather intriguing matter because it treats time as a relative quantity, unlike the absolute way we are used to treating it. .
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Physics

The Great Hadron Collider - LHC

Located at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) on the border between France and Switzerland, the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) is the largest particle accelerator ever built with a circumference of 27 kilometers in diameter, 175 meters below from ground level. Along the tunnel where the particles collide, there are several detectors that record data for various study purposes.
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Physics

Nuclear energy

Among the main forms of electricity production in the world, nuclear power accounts for about 16% of this electricity. However, there are some countries that are more reliant on nuclear power: while in Brazil, for example, only 3% of the electricity used is produced by nuclear plants, in France 78% of the electricity generated by them (2008 data).
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Physics

How do nuclear power plants work?

As already stated, to get a nuclear plant up and running requires first of all enriched uranium. To give you an idea, 0.5kg of enriched U-235 - the amount used to power submarines and nuclear aircraft carriers - is equivalent to 3.8 million liters of gasoline.
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Physics

Thermometry Applications

Thermometry is the branch of physics that studies temperature and the various scales invented over time. It is due to the study of thermometry that temperature measurement equipment is required, such as mercury thermometers… Thermometry has developed a lot in the last 2 centuries due to microscopic studies that have started to be developed ever since.
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Physics

GPS - What It Is, How It Works

Which driver was never lost and was "saved" by a GPS? Since its inception, we can say that GPS is an indispensable tool for drivers, because in addition to identifying their location and guiding the routes to follow, it helps to control traffic, improve safety and the fluidity of traffic in general.
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Physics

3D cinemas

Operation of today's 3D cinemas As already mentioned, the technique used interfered with the visualization of colors, so it was necessary to develop a better technology, but more expensive and complicated, but that does not affect the original colors. This new technology is based on polarization, being now the glasses made by dark lenses and no longer colored as before.
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Physics

Big Bang

For a long time men wondered how the universe would have emerged. Gradually it was necessary to abandon the idea that we occupy a central position in the universe and adopt the view that our location in the universe is insignificant. The Big Bang theory holds that galaxies are moving away from each other, as noted by Edwin Hubble in 1930.
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Physics

How do 3D cinemas work?

Since its inception, cinema has evolved a lot, gaining sound, colors and special effects. The latest news is 3D movies, which need special glasses like the ones below to watch. In 3D movies, scenarios, people, and even cartoon characters can be viewed three-dimensionally, as if they were real and closer to us.
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Physics

Nobel Prizes in Physics (continued)

1917 - Charles Glover Barkla (Great Britain) 1918 - Max Planck (Germany) 1919 - Johannes Stark (Germany) 1920 - Charles Édouard Guillaume (Switzerland) 1921 - Albert Einstein (Germany) 1922 - Niels Bohr (Denmark) 1923 - Robert Andrews Millikan (United States) 1924 - Karl Manne Georg Siegbahn (Sweden) 1925 - James Franck (Germany) - Gustav Hertz (Germany) 1926 - Jean Baptiste Perrin (France) 1927 - Arthur Holly Compton (United States) - Charles Thomson Rees Wilson ( Great Britain) 1928 - Sir Owen Williams Richardson (Great Britain) 1929 - Prince Louis-Victor De Broglie (France) 1930 - Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman (India) 1932 - Werner Heisenberg (Germany) 1933 - Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac (Great Britain) Britain) - Erwin Schrödinger (Austria) 1935 - Sir James Chadwick (Great Britain) 1936 - Carl David Anderson (United States) - Viktor Franz Hess (Austria) 1937 - Clinton Joseph Davisson (United States) - Sir George Paget Thomson ( Great Britain) 1938 - Enrico Fermi (Italy) 1939 - Ernest Orlando Lawrence (United States) 1943 - Otto Stern (United States) 1944 - Isidor Isaac Rabi (United States) 1945 - Wolfgang Pauli (Austria) 1946 - Percy Williams Bridgman (United States) 1947 - Sir Edward Victor Appleton (Great Brittany) 1948 - Lord Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett (Great Britain) 1949 - Hideki Yukawa (Japan) 1950 - Cecil Frank Powell (Great Britain) 1951 - Sir John Douglas Cockcroft (Great Britain) - Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (Ireland) 1952 - Felix Bloch (United States) - Edward Mills Purcel (United States) 1953 - Frits Zernike (Netherlands) 1954 - Max Born (Great Britain) - Walter Bothe (Germany) 1955 - Polykarp Kusch (United States) - Willis Eugene Lamb (United States) 1956 - John Bardeen (United States) - Walter Houser Brattain (United States) - William Shockley (United States) 1957 - Tsung Dao Lee (China) - Chen Ning Yang (China) 1958 - Il´ja Mikhailovich Frank (Soviet Union) - Igor Yevgenyevich Tamm (Soviet Union) - Pavel A lekseyevich Cherenkov (Soviet Union) 1959 - Owen Chamberlain (United States) - Emilio Gino Segrè (United States) 1960 - Donald Arthur Glaser (United States) 1961 - Robert Hofstadter (United States) - Rudolf Ludwig Mößbauer (United States) 1962 - Lev Davidovich Landau (Soviet Union) 1963 - Maria Goeppert-Mayer (United States) - Johannes Hans Daniel Jensen (United States) - Eugene Paul Wigner (United States) 1964 - Nicolay Gennadiyevich Basov (Soviet Union) - Aleksandr Mikhailovich Prokhorov (Soviet Union) - Charles Hard Townes (United States) 1965 - Richard Feynman (United States) - Julian Schwinger (United States) - Shin-Ichiro Tomonaga (Japan) 1966 - Alfred Kastler (France) 1967 - Hans Albrecht Bethe (United States) 1968 - Luis W.
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Physics

What are black holes

In an approach to classical physics, black holes are very large celestial objects - some hundreds of times the mass of the Sun - that occupy a very small space. Its gravitational field is so intense that not even the speed of light is greater than its escape velocity. With this, the light that enters a black hole can no longer come out, so that it cannot be observed by the usual techniques that analyze the light emitted or reflected by celestial objects.
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Physics

Biographies

Georg Simon Ohm Gustav Kirchhoff Heinrich Rudolf Hertz Isaac Newton James Clerk Maxwell James Prescott Joule Johannes Kepler Joseph Louis Lagrange Michael Faraday Nicolas Copernicus Robert Hooke Thomas Alva Edison
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Physics

Dictionary - B

Barometer: instrument for measuring atmospheric pressure, ie the force per unit area exerted by the weight of the atmosphere. Battery: A device that transforms chemical energy into electrical energy. Also called an accumulator, it consists of two or more electrochemical cells connected in series, in parallel or both.
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Physics

How do refrigerators work? (continuation)

The air pressure inside the refrigerator is uniform and as a result the air in the freezer and its surroundings, which is at lower temperatures, is denser than the air in the other parts. Thus, the fact that this air mass is denser causes it to come down, pushing air from the other parts upwards. Furthermore, it is no wonder that refrigerator shelves are made in a grid: this is done to facilitate convection currents.
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Physics

How do refrigerators work? (continuation)

Thermodynamic processes In a nutshell, the operation of popular refrigerators is based on a process of heat transfer from a cold source to a hot source. However, this process is not spontaneous: it takes an amount of external energy, which occurs in the form of work, for this transfer to be possible.
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Physics

Bulb thermometer

The device shown on video at this link, despite the unconventional format, acts as a thermometer. First let's interpret the object as a physical device: The lower bulb acts as a reservoir of liquid, while the connection between the two bulbs is through a spiral capillary tube.
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Physics

What is the definition of SI standard units?

The International System of Units (SI) is the set of measurement units adopted as standard in most countries of the world. Among many conventional units, some are called the standard unit because they do not derive from any other unit; These are: Metro - Unit length; Second - unit of time; Kilogram - Unit of mass; Ampère - Unit of electric current; Kelvin - Temperature unit; Mol - unit of quantification of matter; Candela - Unit of luminous intensity.
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Physics

Nobel Prizes in Physics

Known for the foundation that annually awards the Nobel Prizes, Alfred Nobel left the following statement in his will. "All my assets shall be treated as follows. The capital shall be invested by my executors in secure securities and shall constitute a fund, the participation in which shall be distributed annually as a prize to those who, during the preceding year, shall have conferred the great benefit to mankind.
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